TechPats https://www.techpats.com Technology Patent Services & Intellectual Property Consulting Thu, 08 Nov 2018 20:07:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Recent USPTO Changes: Small Fixes or a Harbinger of Pro-patent Progress? https://www.techpats.com/recent-uspto-changes-small-fixes-or-a-harbinger-of-pro-patent-progress/ https://www.techpats.com/recent-uspto-changes-small-fixes-or-a-harbinger-of-pro-patent-progress/#respond Tue, 02 Oct 2018 18:45:24 +0000 https://www.techpats.com/?p=3061 The Intellectual Property and inventor communities have patiently waited to hear and see the current administration’s ideas for the future of patent policy, chiefly, through the leadership of Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property Andrei Iancu. The new Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has expressed that the administration believes...

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The Intellectual Property and inventor communities have patiently waited to hear and see the current administration’s ideas for the future of patent policy, chiefly, through the leadership of Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property Andrei Iancu. The new Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has expressed that the administration believes that innovation and IP protection are key goals in support of a mission to create sustained economic growth, but recent work, since his 94-0 Senate confirmation in February 2018, has indicated that substantial change may be afoot.

On April 11, 2018, Dir. Iancu highlighted aspirations for the patent system to be defined more by its goals and less by its flaws in a speech at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Patent Policy Conference in a keynote speech titled the “Role of U.S. Patent Policy in Domestic Innovation and Potential Impacts on Investment.” These “flaws” have arguably lead to R&D departments questioning investment of time and resource into patents because of reliability issues as presented in the Chamber’s annual report. Focusing on inventors, Dir. Iancu stated a goal of increasing the reliability of the patent grant and identified those three areas of uncertainty in the patent system: post-grant procedures (e.g., IPRs), patent subject matter eligibility under Alice and § 101, and examination resources.

Recently, patent stakeholders have seen Director Iancu’s USPTO attempt to address each area.

Post-grant Administrative Trials

The Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) has seen at least two big changes in recent months:

  1. The USPTO issued an update to the Office Patent Trial Practice Guide (TPG) on August 13, 2018, to update the guidance set forth in the TPG by incorporating the PTAB’s current practices and provide further explanation of certain aspects. Key updates are reported to be guidance on expert testimony, sur-replies, and oral hearing procedures. The USPTO has chosen to issue updates on a section-by-section, rolling basis and anticipates releasing further revisions.
  2. The PTAB “substantially revised its standard operating procedures (SOPs) regarding paneling of matters before the PTAB and precedential and informative decisions” in two SOPs issued on September 20, 2018. SOP1 details the procedures for administrative law judge panel assignment and for informing parties regarding panel changes, while SOP2 directs the practice of selecting precedential and informative decisions by a committee headed by the Director.

Perhaps most important with the SOPs and the TPG update(s) is the understanding that the USPTO and PTAB are acting more uniform and that the Director is the clear head of the Office.

Subject Matter Eligibility

Director Iancu has expressed his desire for the USPTO to lead the way in evolving a more consistent approach to questions of subject matter eligibility under 35 U.S.C. §101 and the Alice/Mayo progeny of case law. For instance, in his April speech with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce the Director said, “Currently, we’re actively looking for ways to simplify the eligibility determination for our examiners through forward-looking guidance. Through our administration of the patent laws, which we are charged to execute, the USPTO can lead, not just react to, every new case the courts issue.” In his remarks at the Intellectual Property Owners Association Annual Meeting in Chicago on September 24, 2018, the Director offered a noticeably simple summary of a proposed approach:

In sum, the proposed guidance for Section 101, which addresses step 1 of Alice, would explain that eligibility rejections are to be applied only to claims that recite subject matter within the defined categories of judicial exceptions. And even then, a rejection would only be applied if the claim does not integrate the recited exception into a practical application. This provides significantly more clarity for the great bulk of cases.

TechPats’ Counsel, Kevin Rieffel, offered some thoughts in a post at IPWatchdog about what patent professionals expect to see implemented in the near future, but questions remain about how the Director would be able to reconcile case law with a “practical application” approach. Nevertheless, like the “Berkheimer Memo” of April and the MPEP revisions from early 2018, expect any changes in examination procedure to be well supported with substantial citation to precedent.

Examination Procedure

As a result of reported internal systems failures, the USPTO has suggested that the databases and servers have been upgraded and patent practitioners have seen new log-in procedures in the last month. From August 15-23, 2018 the USPTO had issues in filing and prosecuting patent applications due to outages with the Patent Application Locating and Monitoring (PALM) database. The PALM System is the automated data management system used for the retrieval and online updating of the computer records of each patent application. Also of note, PALM also maintains examiner time, activity, and docket records. The USPTO reported that PALM experienced an issue during maintenance and was taken offline to fix the issue. “Among other things,” the Director said, “we now have enhanced servers and performance optimization, such that the resulting condition is better than it was before the outage.” The Director has previously noted long-term USPTO investment in IT solutions and aspirations that AI and machine learning can one day help examiners identify better quality and quantities of prior art for potential rejections.

Of course, there are other changes happening at the Office, as a contributor to Forbes notes, “There’s a new intellectual property sheriff in town,” and stating that the Director has “revamped the PTAB to reduce the number of challenges to properly-issued patents and allow more liberal claim amendments,” as well as started to look for a successor to PTAB Chief Judge David P. Ruschke as he moves to an advisory role. Also, there have been meetings with the Patent Public Advisory Committee (PPAC) about fee adjustments and rulemaking under authority of the America Invents Act including proposals to charge higher fees for filings not in a DOCX format and a potential for annual USPTO Bar dues and CLE requirements. More information is coming out about IPR petitions including a study by Robins Kapler attorneys that duplicative petition practice is fairly common by a few large petitioners and that “the PTAB will commonly issue multiple rulings on petitions from a single entity attacking the same claim.” The patent and inventor communities will patiently wait to see how Director Iancu will both react to new data and use the USPTO to lead positively.

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TechPats Announces New Website Launch https://www.techpats.com/techpats-announces-new-website-launch/ https://www.techpats.com/techpats-announces-new-website-launch/#respond Wed, 15 Aug 2018 19:38:41 +0000 https://www.techpats.com/?p=3053 The new, completely redesigned website offers customers extensive information on the company’s broad range of Intellectual Property services, including Patent Portfolio Management, IP Strategy, Monetization and Litigation Support including Reverse Engineering and Testing Labs capabilities. TechPats’ clients will now have access to information on the company’s expanding technical expertise into areas such as Video & Digital Media,...

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The new, completely redesigned website offers customers extensive information on the company’s broad range of Intellectual Property services, including Patent Portfolio Management, IP Strategy, Monetization and Litigation Support including Reverse Engineering and Testing Labs capabilities. TechPats’ clients will now have access to information on the company’s expanding technical expertise into areas such as Video & Digital Media, Systems & Software Analysis, 5G Communications, IoT and Artificial Intelligence.


TechPats announced today the launch of its newly revamped website. This redesigned site offers customers premier access to business-critical information and services necessary in successfully managing, acquiring, monetizing and litigating their Intellectual Property. TechPats remains committed to its core technical expertise in Wireless, Semiconductor, and Telecommunications and is expanding its services and expertise to support the needs of its clients and the ever-changing technology patent landscape.

The new website design provides TechPats’ global customer base access to its services and technical expertise in any language. Additionally, customers can more easily access its website on their mobile devices and contact the company directly for their IP needs.

“As we celebrate our 20th Anniversary here in 2018, it was only fitting for us to launch a new website and provide our customers additional services and technical expertise to support their IP needs. We remain committed to being a leader in providing clients, across all technology verticals, the highest quality technical patent support,” said Marek Wernik, Ph.D., President of TechPats.

“TechPats continues to invest internally in growing our company and our technical capabilities. We are thankful to all of our clients around the world who continue to trust our team with leading their intellectual property projects. What should be clear here with the new website launch is that TechPats remains committed to the ever changing technical needs of our clients and our resolve to retain our leadership in supporting our clients in all of their intellectual property needs. Our history is proven in our success and our future will only continue in that same regard,” added Chris Wichser, CEO of TechPats.

About the Company

TechPats was founded in 1998 as Telecom Partners Limited, and operated as Technology, Patents & Licensing, Inc. from 2002 until the company rebranded as TechPats in 2014. Throughout this time, TechPats has maintained its reputation as one of the premier patent monetization experts and IP strategists, generating hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for its clients by successfully working with operating companies and law firms on licensing, litigation and acquisition efforts. In 2015, TechPats acquired Global Intellectual Strategies of Ottawa, Canada, growing the company’s in-house reverse engineering/testing services and technical acumen. Today, TechPats continues to serve its global list of reputable clients with an extensive range of technical services from our offices in Philadelphia, Ottawa, and Tokyo.

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Facial Recognition Software: An Update on Quickly Developing Tech https://www.techpats.com/facial-recognition-software-update-quickly-developing-tech/ https://www.techpats.com/facial-recognition-software-update-quickly-developing-tech/#respond Tue, 05 Sep 2017 22:25:45 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2641 Facial Recognition Software: An Update on Quickly Developing Tech Our previous post discussed the advances in facial recognition for travel and security applications. Another eagerly anticipated application of facial recognition technology is the rumored inclusion of this feature in an upcoming iPhone model and other contemporary phones.  While Apple is notoriously tight-lipped about future products,...

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Facial Recognition Software: An Update on Quickly Developing Tech

Our previous post discussed the advances in facial recognition for travel and security applications. Another eagerly anticipated application of facial recognition technology is the rumored inclusion of this feature in an upcoming iPhone model and other contemporary phones.  While Apple is notoriously tight-lipped about future products, it is widely expected that the next iPhone release will be announced on September 12, 2017, and will include facial recognition technology.  Much of the current media excitement was fueled by a recent Korean News report stating, “The new facial recognition scanner with 3-D sensors can deeply sense a user’s face in the millionths of a second.” Many analysts are predicting that facial recognition software will supplant fingerprint sensing as the primary security biometric on most new smartphones.

TechPats Facial Recognition Software Tech Update

Can the Tech Live Up to Expectations?

For this type of new feature to be successful, facial recognition technology has to tackle three important issues: accuracy, speed, and low-light performance.  Of course, most importantly, the recognition has to work well. What good would facial recognition be if the algorithm never matched anyone (or matched everyone)?

What good would facial recognition be if the algorithm never matched anyone (or matched everyone)?

It is envisioned that facial recognition may be used to unlock a user’s phone and to even replace passwords and passcodes for, e.g., financial transactions, like Apple Pay, Google Wallet, Mobile Banking. With bank accounts and personal information protected being protected behind phone security, a failure in transitioning from authentication via “Touch ID” to relying on facial imaging could be very costly.

For instance, previous facial recognition systems have had various limitations and have even been demonstrated as able to be fooled by printed photographs.  Newer systems take advantage of 3D sensors using depth-sensing technology or “structured light.” These systems follow a step-by-step facial recognition process:

  1. A structured light source provides illumination to an object (typically in the infrared spectrum)
  2. An imaging sensor, or camera is used to acquire a 2D image back to the device
  3. An object, such as a face, will distort this received light pattern
  4. The sensor will capture the reflection of the infrared light while the light pattern is invisible to the naked eye
  5. Sophisticated algorithms compute 3D information from this received data for comparison

Unlike searching through a large database of criminals or terrorists, the received data will only have to be compared with the facial profile for the device’s owner(s).

The threshold of the correlation between the baseline facial scan data and a subsequent scan may determine how secure the technology has become. For instance, what if the facial recognition finds a match between the baseline scan and your twin brother, but refuses to recognize you after growing a beard?  The upcoming products—and consumer reaction—will demonstrate if these new 3D sensors and algorithms can provide the necessary level of security.

Facial Recognition Preparing for Widespread Commercial Use

Since these 3D sensors utilize infrared energy, the devices should be able to perform their facial recognition even in the dark, allowing the user to unlock their phone in complete darkness.  While cinema-goers may be disappointed, depending on visible light or even a flash is simply not a valid solution.  Finally, recognition speed is an additional important factor in facial recognition.  Bloomberg reports that users may be able to unlock their new iPhones “within a few hundred milliseconds,” which may make the feature appealing and encourage acceptance.

Qualcomm has been the first to publicly announce products with this technology with the expansion of their Spectra platform for Android platforms  capable of improved biometric authentication and high-resolution depth sensing  “utilizing active sensing for superior biometric authentication, and structured light for a variety of computer vision applications that require real-time, dense depth map generation and segmentation.”

Structured-light systems, as well as related patents, have been around for a while.  One patent that may appear relevant, dated around 1998, discloses a “system for determining a three-dimensional profile of an object” using a light-source to project a structured light pattern on the object and an image-detecting device to detect a sequence of images.

TechPats Facial Recognition Software Update Claim

Apple’s `177 patent

Much of the recent iPhone discussion has been a result of patents granted to Apple this year.  In one Apple patent, the specification describes a “method for face detection” using a depth sensor to capture three-dimensional data and a camera to capture a two-dimensional image of the scene.  Of course, patents do not guarantee that the technology will be implemented in any upcoming devices.

But if all the rumors are correct, we may only have to wait until the September 12th to see what facial recognition features make it into the next iPhone. An earlier Apple patent filed in 2011 discloses unlocking a mobile device using facial recognition that “capture[s] a subsequent image in response to determining that the device moved to a use position, analyze[s] the subsequent image to detect a user’s face, and unlock[s] the device in response to detecting the user’s face.”

With facial recognition technology on the verge of widespread use in smartphones, it will have a significant impact on intellectual property as more companies seek to incorporate facial recognition into their own products. TechPats’ technical expertise and patent knowledge can help companies protect their intellectual property through our licensing support, patent mining, and patent monetization services. Learn more today!

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The Future of Artificial Intelligence – Will Robots/Machines Outsmart Humans? https://www.techpats.com/future-artificial-intelligence-will-robotsmachines-outsmart-humans/ https://www.techpats.com/future-artificial-intelligence-will-robotsmachines-outsmart-humans/#respond Thu, 31 Aug 2017 21:47:31 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2633 The Future of Artificial Intelligence – Will Robots/Machines Outsmart Humans? Recent news in technology related to Artificial Intelligence (AI) has yet again revealed a question from one of the most frightening ideas out of science fiction: Will the technology progress to a point where a machine, computer or robot, will be in the position to...

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The Future of Artificial Intelligence – Will Robots/Machines Outsmart Humans?

Artificial Intelligence Future | TechPatsRecent news in technology related to Artificial Intelligence (AI) has yet again revealed a question from one of the most frightening ideas out of science fiction: Will the technology progress to a point where a machine, computer or robot, will be in the position to control society, in part or as a whole?

Will the technology progress to a point where a machine, computer or robot, will be in the position to control society, in part or as a whole?

The follow-up questions, of course, are how far off is that time and can we prevent it? Well, right now, even the experts and those who work in the AI field certainly do not agree.  At one extreme we have those like Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking who worry that AI will bring an end to humanity, while at the other end of the spectrum we have those like Mark Zuckerberg who believe AI will improve humanity and don’t foresee any significant risks with AI.  While the possibilities for AI applications might surely be endless, if even a few of our time’s top minds and great inventors are disagreeing about the potential for danger, perhaps it’s time to consider this question as something more than just a recycled Hollywood plot.

Interesting Demonstrations of AI Technology

One peculiar instance was when Facebook reportedly abandoned an experiment in which two chatbots were instructed to negotiate and barter to swap hats, balls, and books between themselves.  In the experiment, the chatbots developed a language of their own for conducting the negotiations, a sort of “shorthand” that was understandable only to them.  According to Forbes’ Tony Bradley, researchers from Facebook’s AI Research Labs (FAIR) found that the chatbots had “deviated from the script and were communicating in a new language developed without human input.” The company stressed that it was shut down because they want the bots to be able to communicate with humans and not because of the strange results.

Recently a bot from OpenAI, an Elon Musk company, beat the professionals in the popular real-time strategy battle computer game Dota 2.  Other bots have been able to beat champions at chess, poker, Go, and even Jeopardy, but what is interesting about the OpenAI bot is that it did not know how to play the game. That is, OpenAI’s bot learned how to play and win from scratch by playing against itself in the cloud.

The bot did not always beat the pros and the game was limited to one-on-one play, but the important takeaway is that the bot learned how to play without being purposely programmed for the game. Dota 2 generates a lot of viewership and revenue in the e-sports realm, and similar reports about AI beating professional poker players at Texas Hold ‘Em has people worried about the legitimacy of the competitions.

AI in Everyday Life

Today, machines using AI are in our everyday life; some examples include:

  • Virtual Assistants – Siri, Alexa, Dot, IBM’s Watson
  • Self-Driving Vehicles – Domino’s Pizza Vehicle, Google’s Waymo, Tesla’s Autopilot
  • Customer Service – Chatbots such as Slack’s Growthbot
  • Warehouse – Amazon (Grocery Store)
  • Financial – The use of machine learning by financial institutions
  • Medical – Surgeries
  • Warehouse – Amazon automates many picking and packing processes
  • Financial – Monitoring spending for fraud detection
  • Medical – Autonomous and assisted surgeries

AI has demonstrated major improvements in cancer and disease diagnoses. In each of these instances, the respective AI algorithm is designed for a limited, specific function and, thus, only poses a threat to a relative job market, not all of humanity.  It is not these directly beneficial uses of AI that Elon Musk is asking us to worry about. Sure some jobs may ‘disappear’ (e.g., transition similarly to industrial automation), but it is the misdirection of technology in areas such as autonomous weapons and financial applications that have an actual destructive potential. It’s hardly a far stretch when considering that many of the newer bots are boasting of an ability to self-teach via self-play or experimentation. How do we balance the advancements that Artificial Intelligence has given us with the fear that it might overtake us?

Artificial Intelligence Future

Certainly, the future of Artificial Intelligence is not slowing down and the field is rich for development and investment. Perhaps, for now, the more powerful (and potentially scary) AI programs might be limited by expensive hardware and access, but even that is changing rapidly. In the meantime, it never hurts to stay vigilant and cognizant to make sure humanity always benefits. With regard to intellectual property in the artificial intelligence realm, TechPats will continue to rely on our multi-disciplinary technical and patent expertise while monitoring the landscape of this rapidly expanding technology. Learn more today.

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Augmented Reality Update https://www.techpats.com/augmented-reality-update/ https://www.techpats.com/augmented-reality-update/#respond Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:31:23 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2616 Augmented Reality Update   When most people think of VR or AR (augmented reality), they think of silly glasses or cumbersome headsets used by gamers.  However, with the rumored release of the new iPhone and other recent advances in smartphone hardware and software platforms, we may soon see a “killer app” that could finally bring...

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Augmented Reality Update

 

When most people think of VR or AR (augmented reality), they think of silly glasses or cumbersome headsets used by gamers.  However, with the rumored release of the new iPhone and other recent advances in smartphone hardware and software platforms, we may soon see a “killer app” that could finally bring this technology to the mainstream.  We know from our prior post that Virtual Reality is a computer-generated simulation of a 3D environment allowing users to interact in a seemingly real way.  Augmented Reality (AR) is simply the superposition of computer-generated images in a user’s view, giving them an enhanced view of their surroundings.   While much of this is geared towards gaming or other entertainment applications, recent AR developments are hoped to lead to many new practical applications such as guiding users through tasks ranging from GPS navigation to brain surgery.

There have been huge strides in the development of Augmented Reality systems.  Google Glass, a highly-anticipated break-through product, was placed on hold in early 2015 after a lukewarm reception which included concerns over the high price tag and privacy.  Google announced its latest attempt at AR with the announcement of the Google Lens platform at this year’s development conference.  This technology works with an ordinary smartphone and takes advantage of Google’s vast machine learning experience.  Some things Google Lens can do without the need for any extra hardware include identifying a type of flower you are viewing through your phone’s camera or accessing restaurant reviews and information by flashing your phone over the storefront.

TechPats AR Update based on new innovation in augmented reality and new iPhone technology

Many analysts believe this functionality is a priority at Google, as they likely look to progress beyond web pages and text to images and videos. Google CEO Sundar Pichai stated at the conference that “the fact that computers can understand images and videos has profound implications for our core mission.”

Meanwhile, Apple is moving full speed ahead with AR features, as well, and AR may likely be prominent in the upcoming iOS11 and rumored new iPhone models.  Apple has publicly demonstrated and released ARKit, the development platform tool for bringing AR apps to iOS 11.  ARKit combines with the iPhone hardware – i.e., the camera, motion sensors, and graphics processors – with algorithms to process depth sensing and artificial light rendering, including scale estimation, motion tracking, and ambient light estimation.  At the Apple Worldwide Developers conference in June 2017, one of the standard AR demos featured placing virtual objects such as a lamp, a vase, a cup of coffee on a table — and moving them around.  According to Apple, “ARKit is the largest AR platform in the world.” Reports of potential hardware in a future iPhone could be additional components targeted specifically to aid in AR features, including a custom rear-facing 3D laser system to enable better depth detection, as well as a more accurate type of autofocus for photography. As more examples and proof-of-concept demos are rolling out this summer, many analysts (and iPhone users) expect application developers to soon fill the App Store with games and utilities that leverage ARKit.

TechPats AR Update based on new innovation in augmented reality

The patent landscape is certainly busy in the field of AR.  A recent patent application from Facebook shows a waveguide display with a two-dimensional scanner that can display images of a user display, e.g, a pair of glasses.  Another patent application from Snapchat earlier this year discloses a different approach, i.e. using a database of images and upon detecting the location of a user, inserting an appropriate image into their view while minimizing local processing.  Of course published applications are much different than a granted patent and products based on the specifications may never even reach prototyping, let alone public sale, but it’s evident that leaders in Silicon Valley have set their augmented sights on securing IP in the field.

This should continue to be a busy year in the field of Augmented Reality.  After some significant product announcements previously, the predicted pre-holiday season smartphone roll-out should provide an optimal hardware platform for evolving AR features.  While previous implementations of AR in glasses did not thrive, many consumers have tasted simple AR on their phones through the likes of real-time video stickers and filters, as well as popular games like Pokemon GO. Especially with faster processors, more memory, better graphics, and improved wireless connections, smartphones have become ground zero for the AR revolution. Next, with the imminent transition from goofy gadgets to globally-used devices and real-world applications, the path to widespread acceptance may just be one “killer app” away.

Augmented Reality is just around the corner, learn more about how you can protect your virtual reality patents by contacting us today.


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Blockchain Technology Basics https://www.techpats.com/blockchain-technology-basics/ https://www.techpats.com/blockchain-technology-basics/#respond Mon, 21 Aug 2017 19:13:17 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2605 Blockchain Technology Basics Blockchain technology is gaining momentum and has the potential to make a far greater impact than the web browser technologies of the 1990’s. The term ‘Blockchain Technology’ comprises of a range of technologies that support systems for clearing and executing transactions between two parties without the need for a central authority or...

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Blockchain Technology Basics

Blockchain technology is gaining momentum and has the potential to make a far greater impact than the web browser technologies of the 1990’s. The term ‘Blockchain Technology’ comprises of a range of technologies that support systems for clearing and executing transactions between two parties without the need for a central authority or trusted party.

Blockchain technology is based on the initial concept of a public ledger that exists on a distributed database and it is maintained collaboratively by a network of computers. ONLY one computer can update the ledger.

Think of transferring money from your account to another party’s account directly and instantly without the typical 3-5 business days delay due to the clearing house (trusted party) processing. This is accomplished by simply sending out an encrypted email containing the transaction details such as amount and account numbers to the recipient. Public key encryption is used to enable authentication of the source of the email transaction. The email is also received by the network of computers that maintain the public distributed ledger. One and only one computer in the network gets to update the ledger based on the outcome of specific algorithms. Each transaction is time-stamped and linked to the previous transaction (chained) using encryption.

The concept of block chain was developed by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008 and later implemented as a core component of the digital currency Bitcoin. The concept of the public ledger is now being extended to encompass any type of data such as contracts, process automation, titles, corporate identity and others.

NBCUniversal, as well as new collaborations with Disney, Altice USA, Channel 4 (UK), Cox Communications, Mediaset Italia and TF1 Group (France), will work together on a new and improved advertising approach which would facilitate the secure exchange of non-personal, audience insights for addressable advertising.

The use of Blockchain technology is now legal in Delaware effective August 1, 2017. The law allows state corporations to “use networks of electronic databases (examples of which are described currently as ‘distributed ledgers’ or a ‘blockchain’) for the creation and maintenance of corporate records, including the corporation’s stock ledger.”

Corporations rely on intermediaries like clearinghouses, custodians, exchanges, fiduciaries, or banks to settle transactions. Each intermediary has to verify transactions with their own ledgers, which adds time and cost to each transaction.

With Blockchain Technology, all peer companies can collectively record all transactions digitally and validate transactions without the need for a third party anywhere in the world and without the need for any fees. Transactions that would take days or even weeks with traditional ledgers can be settled in minutes.

The three main characteristics of the enormous disruptive power of Blockchain Technology are decentralization, transparency, and speed. The prospects for improving society with a new wave of innovations are intriguing and exciting. Stay tuned!

 

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Take Off and Land with Facial Recognition https://www.techpats.com/take-off-land-facial-recognition/ https://www.techpats.com/take-off-land-facial-recognition/#respond Mon, 10 Jul 2017 15:31:36 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2587 Take Off and Land with Facial Recognition One of the greatest catalysts to the adoption of a new technology is the degree it helps to address problems in society.  One current problem that certainly could use some help is improving the safety and convenience of commercial air travel.  The technology currently getting attention is using...

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Take Off and Land with Facial Recognition

One of the greatest catalysts to the adoption of a new technology is the degree it helps to address problems in society.  One current problem that certainly could use some help is improving the safety and convenience of commercial air travel.  The technology currently getting attention is using facial recognition to enhance travel security and to streamline airline check-in and boarding.

Early examples of facial recognition technology began in the 1980’s. Kohonen demonstrated that a simple neural net could perform face recognition by computing a face description using the eigenvectors of the face’s autocorrelation matrix.  These eigenvectors are now known as “eigenfaces.”  Although Kohonen’s system was not practical, Kirby and Sirovich soon introduced algorithms that could more easily calculate these eigenfaces, sparking vast research into this field.

Many patents have been granted since then.  For example, Samsung was granted a patent in 2003 that described dividing a facial image into components (eg. Eyes, nose, mouth) and doing processing on each component image instead of the entire facial image.  Apple has also recently been active in this field, considering various ways facial recognition can be used on portable devices.

Returning to the airline travel usage, JetBlue recently announced it was working with US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to test new self-boarding procedures to become the first airline to integrate facial recognition to verify customers at the gate during boarding.  The program will start trials in Boston using a custom-designed camera station to connect to CBP to match with the CBP database of passport, visa, or immigration photos to and verify flight details to allow boarding.

Delta also recently began using the biometric technology by beginning a program in Minneapolis to allow travelers a self-service bag drop, using facial recognition to safely and securely check their own bags, potentially processing twice as many customers per hour over standard methods.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a number of performance reports on facial recognition.  They showed results in 2013 showing that accuracy has improved up to 30 percent since their 2010 report. They evaluated over 75 different algorithms from 16 providers. In February 2017, NIST began a new evaluation method and will provide ongoing results to provide vendors with the most up-to-date data.

Of course, there are many privacy concerns with using this sort of technology for airline travel.  The Biometric Exit program has been debated by politicians since 9/11. This system, using similar technology as the boarding or bag-check systems, allows homeland security to verify that visitors to the US are scanned upon exit and do not overstay their visit.  This program has been accelerated by the recent administration’s new immigration procedures. Enhanced security and the desire by airlines to improve service, while saving costs, will likely prevail and allow for further adoption and advancement of facial-recognition technology.





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Self-Driving or Autonomous – What is the Difference? https://www.techpats.com/self-driving-autonomous-difference/ https://www.techpats.com/self-driving-autonomous-difference/#respond Thu, 08 Jun 2017 17:15:29 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2569 Self-Driving or Autonomous – What is the Difference? More car and technology companies have been teaming up to develop technology that makes a self-driving or autonomous car available to the consumer.  With the increase in awareness of these vehicles, are the terms self-driving and autonomous, in reference to a vehicle, the same? The current NHTSA...

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Self-Driving or Autonomous – What is the Difference?

More car and technology companies have been teaming up to develop technology that makes a self-driving or autonomous car available to the consumer.  With the increase in awareness of these vehicles, are the terms self-driving and autonomous, in reference to a vehicle, the same?

The current NHTSA Federal Automated Vehicle Policy, which sets the testing guidelines for US DOT, has adopted the SAE International definitions for the levels of automation for vehicles.  These definitions divide vehicles into 5 levels, each with an increasing amount of automation and a decreasing amount of driver involvement.  The following outlines the specifics of each level.

  • In SAE Level 0, the human driver does all tasks related to operating the vehicle
  • In SAE Level 1, an automated system on the vehicle can sometimes assist the human driver.  These exist today in vehicle warning systems, such as blind spot detection, back-up detection, and lane departure detection.
  • In SAE Level 2, an automated system on the vehicle can actually conduct some parts of the driving tasks while the human driver monitors the environment and performs the rest of the required driving tasks.  These exist today in systems such as advanced cruise control, parking assist, lane keep assist, and automatic braking
  • In SAE Level 3, an automated system can do both actually conduct some parts of a driving task and monitor the driving environment in some instances, but the human driver must be ready to take back control when the system requests.  These exist today in vehicles from Tesla and Mercedes for use in highway environments where the lanes of the road are clearly marked.  GM will debut a similar system this fall In the Cadillac CT6 sedan.
  • In SAE Level 4, an automated system can both conduct the task of driving and monitoring the environment, without the need for a human driver to take back control.  Operation of the system is limited to certain environments and conditions.  These systems are currently being tested by Google, Uber, Apple, and Samsung.  Additionally, these systems have been tested in trucks by Volvo, Otto (Uber owned) and Daimler (Mercedes Benz).
  • In SAE Level 5, an automated system that can perform all driving tasks, under all conditions that a human driver could perform.

Based on these policy definitions, an autonomous vehicle at levels 4 and 5 certainly is self-driving, but a self-driving vehicle at level 3 is not autonomous as it is limited in the operating environment and requires a human driver that can take control when needed.  Cars with self-driving capability are currently available, with car manufacturers continuing to add this feature to more models each year.  Analysts predict that by 2020 cars with self-driving capability will take off and be widely available.  When autonomous cars will be available to the public will require innovations in sensor technology for size, manufacturability, cost, an expanded detailed map database, and public acceptance.  Analysts predict that by 2030 autonomous vehicles will be in use in cities and urban areas.



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3D Printing Technologies: An Overview https://www.techpats.com/3d-printing-technologies-overview/ https://www.techpats.com/3d-printing-technologies-overview/#respond Thu, 27 Apr 2017 20:41:53 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2428 3D Printing Technologies: An Overview   3D printing is sometimes referred to as Additive Manufacturing (AM). In 3D printing, one creates a design of an object using software, and the 3D printer creates the object by adding layer upon layer of material until the shape of the object is formed.  The object can be made...

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3D Printing Technologies: An Overview

 

3D printing is sometimes referred to as Additive Manufacturing (AM). In 3D printing, one creates a design of an object using software, and the 3D printer creates the object by adding layer upon layer of material until the shape of the object is formed.  The object can be made using a number of printing materials, including plastics, powders, filaments and paper.

There are a number of 3D printing technologies, and this article provides an overview of those technologies.

Stereolithography (SLA)

Stereolithography makes use of a liquid plastic as the source material and this liquid plastic is transformed into a 3D object layer by layer1.  Liquid resin is placed in a vat that has a transparent bottom.   A UV (UltraViolet) laser traces a pattern on the liquid resin from the bottom of the vat to cure and solidify a layer of the resin.  The solidified structure is progressively dragged up by a lifting platform while the laser forms a different pattern for each layer to create the desired shape of the 3D object3.

TechPats 3d printing
Schematic representation of Stereolithography: a light-emitting device a) (a laser or DLP) selectively illuminates the transparent bottom c) of a tank b) filled with a liquid photo-polymerizing resin. The solidified resin d) is progressively dragged up by a lifting platform e)
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereolithography

Digital Light Processing (DLP)

3D printing DLP technology is very similar to Stereolithography but differs in that it uses a different light source and makes use of a liquid crystal display panel1.  This technology makes use of more conventional light sources and the light is controlled using micro mirrors to control the light incident on the surface of the object being printed. The liquid crystal display panel works as a photomask.  This mechanism allows for a large amount of light to be projected onto the surface to be cured, thereby allowing the resin to harden quickly1.

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)

With this technology, objects can be built with production-grade thermoplastics1.   Objects are built by heating a thermoplastic filament to its melting point and extruding the thermoplastic layer by layer.   Special techniques can be used to create complex structures.  For example, the printer can extrude a second material that will serve as support material for the object being formed during the printing process1.  This support material can later be removed or dissolved.

TechPats 3d printing

Fused deposition modelling: 1-Nozzle ejecting molten material, 2-Deposited material (modeled part), 3-Controlled movable table
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fused_deposition_modeling

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)

SLS has some similarities with Stereolithography.  However, SLS makes use of powdered material that is placed in a vat. For each layer, a layer of powdered material is placed on top of the previous layer using a roller and then the powdered material is laser sintered according to a certain pattern for building up the object to be created.   Interestingly, the portion of the powdered material that is not sintered can be used to provide the support structure and this material can be removed after the object is formed for re-use1.

TechPats 3d printing

Selective Laser Sintering Process

Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

The SLM process is very similar to the SLS process.  However, unlike the SLS process where the powdered material is sintered the SLM process involves fully melting the powdered material1.

Electronic Beam Melting (EBM)

This technology is also much like SLM. However, it makes use of an electron beam instead of a high-powered laser1.  The electron beam fully melts a metal powder to form the desired object.   The process is slower and more expensive than for SLM with a greater limitation on the available materials.

Laminated Object Manufacturing (LOM)

This is a rapid prototyping system. In this process, layers of material coated with adhesive are fused together with heat and pressure and then cut into shape using a laser cutter or knife1,2.    More specifically, a foil coated with adhesive is overlaid on the previous layer and a heated roller heats the adhesive for adhesion between the two layers.  Layers can be made of paper, plastic or metal laminates1. The process can include post-processing steps that include machining and drilling.  This is a fast and inexpensive method of 3D printing1.  With the use of an adhesion process, no chemical process is necessary and relatively large parts can be made2.

TechPats 3d printing

Laminated Object Manufacturing
Source: http://www.livescience.com/40310-laminated-object-manufacturing.html

References Used:

  1. http://3dprintingfromscratch.com/common/types-of-3d-printers-or-3d-printing-technologies-overview/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laminated_object_manufacturing
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereolithography



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Artificial Intelligence and its Potential Implications on Patents https://www.techpats.com/artificial-intelligence-potential-implications-patents/ https://www.techpats.com/artificial-intelligence-potential-implications-patents/#respond Thu, 23 Mar 2017 19:23:22 +0000 http://www.techpats.com/?p=2401 Artificial Intelligence and its Potential Implications on Patents   Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a technology that has seen a profound rise in attention within the last few years.  The increase in the technology’s media coverage has been the result of consistent progress made in improving its capabilities. The expansion of AI’s capabilities has fostered its...

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Artificial Intelligence and its Potential Implications on Patents

 

TechPats AI Tech Feature Artificial IntelligenceArtificial Intelligence (AI) is a technology that has seen a profound rise in attention within the last few years.  The increase in the technology’s media coverage has been the result of consistent progress made in improving its capabilities. The expansion of AI’s capabilities has fostered its adaptation into areas such as business, medicine, and automotive. The concept of AI was once the subject of imaginative thinking found in the realm of literature. Stories ranging from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to 2004’s David Mitchell novel Cloud Atlas all address the concept of and questions surrounding AI. A machine’s adaptation of cognitive functions that are associated with the human mind, functions such as understanding of language, problem-solving, and learning, are what classify it as AI.

The origin of Artificial Intelligence (AI) can be traced to the works of Leibniz, Boole, and Turing to name a few. The field of modern AI research was born at a famous 1956 conference at Dartmouth College from the work of five scientists from Carnegie Mellon, MIT, and IBM: Newell, Simon, McCarthy, Minsky and Samuel. They predicted that machines would be able to perform any work that a human can perform within a generation.  The field of AI has grown dramatically in the last 60 years producing many commercial products and services along the way.

Some basic technologies that comprise AI include:

Boolean Search

These are algorithms that provide a type of search allowing users to combine keywords with operators such as AND, NOT and OR to further produce more relevant results. For example, a Boolean search could be “receiver” AND “cable box”. This would limit the search results to only those documents containing the two keywords.

Natural Language Processing (NLP)

NLP comprises AI algorithms that allow computers to process and understand human languages.

Natural Language Search (NLS)

NLS comprises algorithms that perform searches by identifying content that matches a topic described by a user in plain language.

Machine Learning

Machine learning is a method of data analysis that automates analytical model building. Using algorithms that iteratively learn from data, machine learning allows computers to find hidden insights without being explicitly programmed where to look.

A representative commercial AI platform is IBM Watson, a cloud-based AI product that provides Application Program Interfaces (APIs) that “can understand all forms of data to reveal business-critical insights” harnessing “the power of cognitive computing.” APIs are organized into various products for building cognitive search and content analytics engines; configuring virtual agents with company information, using pre-built content and engaging customers in a conversational, personalized manner, and building applications to discover meaningful insights in unstructured text without writing any code.

We see examples of AI in our daily lives, from Apple’s Siri engaging in interactive dialogue with iPhone users to Amazon’s Alexa placing an order for toilet paper at our beckoning. Paying bills by phone or making a customer service inquiry online will bring them face to face with a computer algorithm designed to address their very needs. Voice recognition and text analyzing software has allowed service providers to pinpoint their customers’ exact needs. This ingenuity has also translated to AI applications being programmed with emotional intelligence that allows it to tailor responses based on a customer’s behavior.

AI is consistently being programmed to become smarter than human beings, sometimes becoming more efficient at doing human jobs. In medicine, AI has been used to identify skin cancer in patients by using a Google-developed algorithm to classify 130,000 high-resolution images of skin lesions representing over 2,000 different diseases. The algorithm was able to match the performance of twenty-one dermatologists in correctly identifying benign lesions. An AI system designed to imitate the human brain’s capacity for vision has been found to be able to diagnose congenital cataracts using 410 images of children with the disease, and 476 images of children without it. The system and three ophthalmologists looked at 50 cases involving a variety of medical situations designed by a panel of experts to be challenging. The AI system correctly diagnosed all of the cases while each of the three ophthalmologists missed one case.

With machines seeming to have surpassed human performance in fields such as medicine, the future for AI technology promises to impact the ways in which human beings work. Still, the debate remains, can AI surpass human capability, or is it best used as a tool to aid humanity in work? With these questions in mind, the implications for the rise of AI on patents and Intellectual Property are also subject to debate.

With AI’s advanced functionality in fields such as medicine, the technology may well be on its way to creating its own technology and applications. At the end of 2016, Google’s Neural Machine Translation system was reported to have developed its own internal language to represent the concepts it uses to translate other languages. While this may only be the beginning of AI’s capacity to create, the evidence suggests that the technology may one day function with its own independent mind. AI having independent thought and the capacity to create has major implications for patents and Intellectual Property. With the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) defining Intellectual Property as “creations of the mind, such as inventions”, the definition of “mind” in this context is left for debate: Whether a human mind or a robot mind. Still, AI can only create potentially patentable inventions. With this in mind, a human creator of AI technology that creates its own patentable inventions would logically own those patent rights.



 

 

 

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